Trevor Wallace Takes Aim At Mezcal Snobs in New Video
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‘It’s Like Autozone in a Glass’: YouTube Comedian Trevor Wallace Takes Aim At Mezcal Snobs in New Video — Here’s What He Got Wrong

 

Years after coining the viral White Claw slogan “Ain’t no laws when you’re drinking Claws,” internet comedian Trevor Wallace has turned his sights to agave spirits.

Earlier this week, Wallace was appointed as the unlikely brand ambassador for High Noon Tequila Seltzer. Now, he’s taking swings at the most pretentious and unbearable of spirits lovers — mezcal snobs.

If you’ve ever been introduced to mezcal by a bartender, relative, friend or self-important enthusiast, you’ll probably find much to relate to in Wallace’s latest video. Wearing thin-wired glasses and holding a seemingly endless supply of cigarettes, Wallace spouts off one-liners as he lounges around an empty bar. He remarks, “mezcal is actually Spanish for ‘Marlboro‘” as he sprinkles loose tobacco into an open glass.

Later, he blows a puff of lackluster smoke toward his drink while proclaiming, “Tastes like a Hard Rock Cafe if they opened a vape shop.” Other zingers include “it’s like tequila with a neck tattoo” and “subtle tones of mahogany, oak and a George Foreman grill.”

The schtick rings true to all the common tropes; mezcal is smokey and those who drink it are hipsters. However, at the risk of sounding like a pretentious mezcal snob (which, we definitely are), Wallace got a few things wrong.

First and foremost, mezcal doesn’t always taste like a smoke bomb. While tequila is distilled from steamed agave, mezcal is distilled from agave roasted in massive underground pits. That sometimes days-long roasting process has earned mezcal the unofficial nickname of “tequila’s smoky cousin.”

But there are so, so, so many other flavors that can be contained within a quality mezcal. Hints of fruit, vegetables, minerality and clay can all drift to the forefront based on the distillation method and region of origin. There’s even an entire category of aged mezcals that trade out smoke for whiskey-like notes of caramel and chocolate (admittedly even more pretentious depending on who you ask).

Trevor Wallace

Two vastly different spirits. (Photos: Del Maguey, Desolas)

Mezcal brands like Desolas, who distill using a 25-year-matured agave varietal that’s lightly roasted above ground, boast bright grassy flavors unrecognizable from the average spirit. Compare that to Del Maguey Vida, a boldly smoke-heavy mezcal that’s roasted underground for over a week, and you’ll begin to see the difference.

Though the hoity-toity world of mezcal can often feel impenetrable, don’t let the hipsters make it sound like something you won’t like. There’s always a little something for everyone.

Read More: 

Mezcal Isn’t Always Smokey: 5 Of Our Favorite Expressions That Redefine The Spirit’s Often Misplaced Stereotype

From Guerrero to Oaxaca: 5 Best Top Shelf Mezcals To Seek Out in 2023

Exploring Agave: Getting To Know The Families Behind Del Maguey Mezcal

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Pedro Wolfe is the managing editor of Tequila Raiders. With several years of experience writing for the New York Daily News and the Foothills Business Daily under his belt, Pedro aims to combine quality reviews and recipes with incisive articles on the cutting edge of the tequila world. Pedro has traveled to the heartland of the spirits industry in Tequila, Mexico, and has conducted interviews with agave spirits veterans throughout Mexico, South Africa and California. Through this diverse approach, Tequila Raiders aims to celebrate not only tequila but the rich tapestry of agave spirits that spans mezcal, raicilla, bacanora, pulque and so much more.